Can mediation work if you can’t be in the same room as your spouse?

| Apr 23, 2021 | Mediation & Collaborative Law |

Divorce often starts at the worst point in your relationship with your spouse. The two of you may have long since stopped working together or effectively communicating with one another.

Once you decide to call it quits, things could go from bad to worse. It may be impossible for the two of you to make eye contact without a screaming fight ensuing. Alternatively, you may feel so hurt or betrayed by infidelity or other issues that just seeing your spouse causes you to burst into tears.

Many people want a low-conflict divorce like the kind possible through remediation, but they really can’t imagine sitting in a room to work things out with their soon-to-be-ex. Does that mean mediation isn’t an option?

Caucusing during mediation can help the two of you keep the peace

There is little question that the fastest and the most effective form of mediation involves you, your spouse, the mediator and perhaps your attorneys all together in the same space. However, when that isn’t an option either for emotional or logistical reasons, mediation could still be a workable solution for the outstanding issues in your divorce.

Caucusing during mediation involves the mediator going back and forth between separate rooms or even different facilities and communicating individually with the parties trying to resolve their conflict. It works well in cases with intense emotions or conflicting daily schedules. The caucus approach can mean that you won’t have to directly see each other and that no one loses their cool. Still, it can be a longer process than traditional mediation.

Looking at different ways for you to communicate and approach your disagreements can help the two of you find a collaborative solution to your upcoming divorce.